The most exciting Brewers wins of Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey 2018

MILWAUKEE — Ryan Braun‘s huge ninth-inning home run in the Brewers’ opening series in San Diego didn’t make this list. Nor did Lorenzo Cain playing the role of traffic cop in a brilliant bit of baserunning against the Cubs, Eric Thames‘ dramatic walk-off home run against the Rockies or Orlando Arcia‘s surprise two-RBI bunt double against the Reds.

Those moments and more all deserved mention, but the rules say a Top 10 list can only have 10 entries, so here are our picks, in chronological order, for the best of the best of the Brewers’ season:

MILWAUKEE — Ryan Braun‘s huge ninth-inning home run in the Brewers’ opening series in San Diego didn’t make this list. Nor did Lorenzo Cain playing the role of traffic cop in a brilliant bit of baserunning against the Cubs, Eric Thames‘ dramatic walk-off home run against the Rockies or Orlando Arcia‘s surprise two-RBI bunt double against the Reds.

Those moments and more all deserved mention, but the rules say a Top 10 list can only have 10 entries, so here are our picks, in chronological order, for the best of the best of the Brewers’ season:

April 3: Back-to-back for the win
In the first contest in Major League history that started and ended with back-to-back home runs, Dexter Fowler and Tommy Pham went deep for the Cardinals within the game’s first three pitches, only to  Custom Chiefs Jersey be answered by Christian Yelich and Braun with two outs in the bottom of the ninth. Yelich, down to his final strike, tied it with his first Brewers home run before Braun smashed the next pitch into the home bullpen for a stunning 5-4 win.

Video: Must C Clutch: Yelich, Braun go back-to-back for win

April 21: Aguilar’s lucky 13
Jesus Aguilar‘s epic at-bat leading off the bottom of the ninth inning was so long, Brewers manager Craig Counsell almost forgot it began with two strikes. And it was so good, with Aguilar flicking seven two-strike fouls before crushing the 13th pitch from Marlins reliever Junichi Tazawa for a walk-off home run and a 6-5 Brewers win at Miller Park, that Aguilar could proudly say he’d never had a better at-bat, “Not even in Nintendo.” It was one of the moments that won Aguilar regular duty at first base by the middle of May, and eventually a spot on the National League All-Star team via fan balloting.

Video: Must C Conclusion: Aguilar hammers walk-off HR in 9th

April 30: Hader strikes out eight
“I’ve never seen a performance like that,” said Brewers manager Craig Counsell after Josh Hader became the first pitcher in history to record all eight outs via strikeout in an electric 2 2/3-inning performance to close out a 6-5 win over the Reds. It was the signature performance of Hader’s fascinating season, in which the Brewers often used him for multi-inning stints with multiple days off in-between, and Hader set a franchise record for strikeouts by a reliever.

Video: Must C Classic: Hader K’s 8 in 2 2/3 IP for 4th save

May 13: Peralta pitches for mom
It was a magical Mother’s Day in Denver. Brewers pitching prospect Freddy Peralta was supposed to start the day before at Triple-A Colorado Springs, in front of a mother and father who had never seen him pitch as a pro. Instead, the Brewers needed an arm after Chase Anderson fell ill, so the entire Peralta family traveled up Interstate 25 to see him flirt with a no-hitter while striking out 13 Rockies over 5 2/3 scoreless innings, setting a franchise record for whiffs in a Major League debut. Peralta went on help hold together the starting rotation by making 14 Brewers starts, holding opponents to a .176 average. Among starting pitchers who worked at least 70 innings, only Boston’s Chris Sale was tougher to hit.

Video: MIL@COL: Peralta strikes out 13 over 5 2/3 in debut

July 31: Lo Cain goes high
The Brewers tried to add a starting pitcher before the non-waiver Trade Deadline, but they couldn’t find a deal to their liking. Wade Miley helped ease the disappointment with seven shutout innings in a 1-0 win at Dodger Stadium fueled by Cain, who drove in the game’s only run with a double in the third inning before saving a run in the seventh with the best of a series of superlative defensive plays. He leaped at the center-field wall to pull back Cody Bellinger‘s high fly, preserving what became a two-hit shutout for Miley and relievers Joakim Soria and Jeremy Jeffress. “I said, ‘Damn,'” Bellinger said. “That’s all you can say.”

Video: Must C Catch: Cain robs HR to protect 1-0 lead in 7th

Aug 24: Brewers go past midnight to beat Bucs
The craziest home game of the season was a five-hour, 36-minute marathon against the Pirates that saw the Brewers come back from a two-run deficit in the 15th inning for an improbable 7-6 win. Erik Kratz hit a game-tying two-run single for the Brewers’ first runs since the first inning, and Arcia followed-up with a walk-off knock to cap a three-run rally highlighted by reliever Jordan Lyles taking a critical two-out walk. It was Lyles who came around to score the decisive run. According to Elias, the last time the Brewers won after trailing by multiple runs in extra innings was Aug. 14, 1992, against the Red Sox.

Video: Must C Conclusion: Crew rally in 15th to top Pirates

Aug 29: Yelich’s six-hit cycle
In what was arguably the most entertaining game of the season, Yelich tied a franchise record with six hits and became the ninth player in club history (and the first since George Kottaras in 2011) to hit for the cycle in a 13-12, 10-inning win over the Reds. That was only one storyline in a wild win that also featured Yelich throwing one Reds runner out at the plate, a disputed three-run home run by Reds pitcher Michael Lorenzen, and the Reds tying the game in the eighth thanks to an overturned call.

Video: Must C Cycle: Yelich becomes 8th Brewer to notch feat

Sept. 9: Schoop’s slam
It started with a stare and ended with a slam. Actually, it ended with a sweep. The Brewers turned a one-run deficit into a three-run lead against Madison Bumgarner and the Giants in a tense sixth inning, punctuated by midseason pickup Jonathan Schoop‘s two-out grand slam that sent Milwaukee to a 6-3 win and a three-game sweep at Miller Park ahead of a huge series against the Cubs at Wrigley Field. It pushed the Brewers 20 games over .500 for the first time since the end of 2011, and was particularly satisfying considering it came immediately after Counsell and two Brewers players had just been ejected in the wake of Bumgarner plunking Braun with a curiously misplaced pitch.

“It’s a great moment for Schoop,” said Counsell. “He hasn’t probably got off to the start he wanted to get off to here, but with one swing of the bat, it becomes  Custom Chiefs Jerseys a huge moment in the season.”

Video: Must C Clips: Schoop’s grand slam after Braun HBP

Sept. 17: Bi-cycle
According to Elias, only four players in Major League Baseball’s long history had hit for the cycle more than once in a single season. No one had ever done it twice against the same team in a single season. That changed Sept. 17, when Yelich logge Customized Chiefs Jersey For Sale d his second cycle against the Reds in less than three weeks. Ever humble, he credited the runner in front of him, Curtis Granderson, for scoring on the play and ensuring that Yelich would get credit for the triple he needed to complete the feat. It was another huge night for Yelich in a sensational second half that thrust the 26-year-old into the conversation for the National League MVP Award.

Video: Must C Cycle: Yelich makes history with his 2nd cycle

Sept 26: The clincher
Perhaps the Brewers got a little help from the baseball gods on the way to punching their ticket to the postseason. Protecting a one-run lead in the eighth inning, it looked as if the Cardinals were on their way to tying the game on a Mike Moustakas throwing error. But the runner, Adolis Garcia, slipped on his way to the plate and was out thanks to a perfect throw by Hernan Perez and quick recovery after a brief moment of “extreme panic” for catcher Erik Kratz, who initially tagged the air. There was no such drama in the ninth inning for Jeremy Jeffress, and the Brewers were off to celebrate their first playoff berth since 2011.

“We believe,” said Jeffress. “Dude, I don’t know. If he would have kept running, he would have had it. I have no idea what happened. Fortunately, it played out for us. … Now there’s work to do.”

Video: MIL@STL: Perez throws out Garcia at home to end 8th

Adam McCalvy has covered the Brewers for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @AdamMcCalvy and like him on Facebook.


Milwaukee Brewers

Christian Yelich pens le Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey tter to Brewers fans

ST. LOUIS — Christian Yelich was curious: What was the early word on how his Players’ Tribune essay was being received back in Milwaukee?

He may find out beginning Friday night, when the Brewers return home to play the Tigers on the final weekend of the regular season. Yelich delivered a call to action of sorts in his essay published Wednesday, urging the Miller Park faithful to turn the volume up another notch as the Brewers push for the National League Central crown.

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ST. LOUIS — Christian Yelich was curious: What was the early word on how his Players’ Tribune essay was being received back in Milwaukee?

He may find out beginning Friday night, when the Brewers return home to play the Tigers on the final weekend of the regular season. Yelich delivered a call to action of sorts in his essay published Wednesday, urging the Miller Park faithful to turn the volume up another notch as the Brewer Customized Chiefs Jersey For Sale s push for the National League Central crown.

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Tweet from @PlayersTribune: “I need you to make Miller Park as loud as humanly possible these last few days of the season.���It’s all on the line. Playoffs. History. Everything. @ChristianYelich and the @Brewers have a favor to ask all of Wisconsin.https://t.co/btLacpfzCL

Here’s some of what he Custom Chiefs Jersey  wrote:

I guess that isn’t really much of a favor at all considering that you guys already do that anyway. But you know what I mean — make it even LOUDER than normal. Don’t hold anything back. And then, you know, we’ll feed off that energy and, well.…

Let’s just see what happens, Milwaukee.

We may not be a team overflowing with superstars, and we may not be on national TV all the time or get all the headlines or whatever, but I know we have something special here. And it’s largely because none of that stuff matters to us.

All we do is go out, grind and hustle, and compete like there’s no tomorrow.

But like I said before: We need you.

All  Men’s Nike Custom Made Kansas City Chiefs Elite Red Team Color NFL Jersey of you.

“You want everybody to be fired up and excited about what this team is doing and going through,” Yelich said. “You want everyone to feel a part of it, because like I said in the article, we feel like we’re an extension of the city of Milwaukee and the state of Wisconsin, and all the Brewers fans.

“I’m not saying they weren’t fired up throughout the year, that the place wasn’t loud, but hopefully it’s an exciting atmosphere and there are a lot of memories to be made of not only us, the players, but the fans as well.”

The Brewers are expecting crowds near 40,000 on Friday and Saturday, and in the mid-30,000 for Sunday’s finale. They are 10th in the Majors in average home attendance at 34,856 per game through the first 78 home contests, just behind the Red Sox and about 3,000 fans per game ahead of the 11th-ranked Nationals.

While it remains to be seen whether Yelich’s piece spurs any last-minute sales, Brewers manager Craig Counsell gave it high marks.

“What was so cool about it [is] that’s Christian. That’s who he is,” Counsell said. “He’s real. It was perfect because it was real. If you want to know about Christian Yelich, read it because that’s who he is.”

The process of penning the piece, Yelich said, spanned the past two weeks, including putting his initial thoughts down and then making a series of edits. The finishing touches were applied Tuesday before Yelich added to his NL MVP Award credentials by hitting a three-run triple and a three-run homer in the Brewers’ 12-4 win over the Cardinals at Busch Stadium.

Video: MIL@STL: Yelich hits 3-run HR, 3-run triple vs. Cards

The essay was published Wednesday morning, and in it Yelich shares insight into the team’s clubhouse culture, his take on the Brewers-Cubs rivalry and an anecdote about his first days with the team. Days after the Brewers acquired him in a blockbuster trade with the Marlins, Yelich was on owner Mark Attanasio’s private jet, traveling from Southern California to Milwaukee for the Brewers’ winter fanfest. Along the way, they stopped in Scottsdale, Ariz., to pick up Hall of Famer Robin Yount and legendary broadcaster Bob Uecker.

Yelich wrote that it felt like a “Brewers legends trip.”

“Hopefully everybody enjoys it,” Yelich said. “It’s a little bit of an insight into this team, this clubhouse, what we’ve experienced throughout the year, and what we’re looking forward to going forward.”

Adam McCalvy has covered the Brewers for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @AdamMcCalvy and like him on Facebook.


Milwaukee Brewers,
Christian Yelich

Brewe Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey rs clinch but want the NL Central title

ST. LOUIS — On Wednesday, there was a celebration.

On Thursday, some well-earned rest.

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ST. LOUIS — On Wednesday, there was a celebration.

On Thursday, some well-earned rest.

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And come Friday?

“There’s work to do,” said Brewers closer Jeremy Jeffress, who recorded the final four outs — the first harrowing, the final three a breeze — of Wednesday’s 2-1 win over the Cardinals at Busch Stadium that ensured Milwaukee a spot in the postseason.

Shop for Brewers postseason gear | Top 10 Brewers moments in 2018 | Yelich pens letter to fans

At worst, the Brewers will host the National League Wild Card Game on Tuesday night.

But the big prize is still in play: The NL Central crown. The Brewers remained a half-game behind the Cubs after Chicago beat the Pirates in 10 innings on Wednesday.

The Cub Cheap Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey s have four games remaining — one more against the Pirates on Thursday (who are starting Brewer-killer Trevor Williams), then three against the Cardinals, who were clinging to their own postseason hopes Wednesday night.

“We’ve got work to do still in the regular season,” Brewers manager Craig Counsell said. “But we have to celebrate for a night.”

Added Jeffress: “We’re not stopping. The season’s not over yet. We’re going to go home and play like we’re going t Custom Chiefs Jersey o win the division.”

Video: MIL@STL: Brewers on 1st postseason since 2011

It does not take an Customized Chiefs Jersey For Sale  expert to see the benefit of avoiding the winner-take-all Wild Card Game, especially for a team like the Brewers driven by a stout bullpen. The winner would then go on the road to begin a best-of-five NL Division Series, with Game 1 scheduled for Thursday and Game 2 the next night.

The division winner would benefit from the extra rest.

“For me, it’s all about winning the division,” Lorenzo Cain said. “I don’t really like playing winner-take-all-type games. Winning the division is our main focus. We understand the Cubs are a really good team and we have to play Detroit and get after it. We have to find a way to play consistent baseball, to score some runs, play some solid defense and do what we’ve been doing all year.”

Uecker included in celebration

At some point, club officials will have to start planning for the potential of a Wild Card Game, but they were pushing that to Thursday or Friday in hopes that their path became more clear. As of Wednesday, there were too many possibilities to ponder, including a home game against the Rockies, Dodgers or Cardinals, or sitting back and watching that contest unfold on television.

Cain knows both paths, since he and Mike Moustakas played for the Royals against Stephen Vogt and the A’s in the 2014 American League Wild Card Game, an extra-inning classic won by Kansas City. Erik Kratz was also on that Royals team. Joakim Soria (’15 Pirates), Jonathan Schoop (’16 Orioles) and Curtis Granderson  Custom Chiefs Jerseys (’16 Mets) also experienced Wild Card Games.

Video: MIL@STL: Brewers broadcaster Bob Uecker on postseason

Considering what remains at stake, some wondered whether the Brewers’ celebration might be a bit muted when they clinched merely a postseason spot.

It was most definitely not.

“It’s never muted Men’s Nike Custom Made Kansas City Chiefs Elite Red Team Color NFL Jersey ,” Kratz said. “You never know when this is going to be your last chance. We played 159 games to get to this point. If it’s muted, then you’ve been to it a lot of times. We’re celebrating the first 159 games. We’ve got three more to go.”

Adam McCalvy has covered the Brewers for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @AdamMcCalvy and like him on Facebook.


Milwaukee Brewers

ML Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey B’s most unlikely playoff heroes

What do all playoff teams in history have in common? Their rosters are stacked with recognizable star players who deservedly receive most of the credit for everything good that happened to their clubs both in October, and in the weeks leading up to it.

But take a closer look — for every handful of All-Star-caliber players, there’s at least one lesser-known contributor whose unexpected performance ended up being a difference-maker.

What do all playoff teams in history have in common? Their rosters are stacked with recognizable star players who deservedly receive most of the credit for everything good that happened to their clubs both in October, and in the weeks leading up to it.

But take a closer look — for every handful of All-Star-caliber players, there’s at least one lesser-known contributor whose unexpected performance ended up being a difference-maker.

The 2018 National League Wild Card Game between the Cubs and Rockies at Wrigley Field provided a beautiful example. The first run was driven in by Rockies MVP candidate Nolan Arenado. The Cubs’ tying run in the eighth inning was driven in by their own MVP candidate, Javier Baez. And finally, after the game went 1-1 into the top of the 13th, the game-winning run was driven in by … Tony Wolters.

Wait, who?

Yes, it was Wolters, a light-hitting backup catcher who had 31 hits in 182 at-bats all year — a .170 batting average — who sparked the Rockies to victory in extra innings of a winner-take-all playoff game on the road. Wolters wasn’t even in the game until the 12th inning, serving as Coloardo’s third catcher behind Chris Iannetta and Drew Butera.

Unsung heroes don’t pop up on every postseason roster every year, but all teams can point to at least one in their history, including this year’s pool of postseason participants:

Angels: Adam Kennedy
The Angels needed one more win against the Twins in the 2002 American League Championship Series to clinch the first pennant in team history, and their heroics in the clincher came from a rather unlikely source. Kennedy, the team’s No. 9 hitter, was eighth on the Halos with seven regular-season homers, but he hit three long balls in ALCS Game 5 in a 13-5 rout. More >

Astros: Brandon Backe
It was the final day of the 2004 regular season, the red-hot Astros needed just one more win to clinch the NL Wild Card, and having Roger Clemens slated to make the start likely helped Houston feel quite good about its chances. But Clemens fell ill, and the Astros had to turn to Backe, a converted outfielder, who promptly pitched them to the win. He earned his chances to start in the postseason, and in NLCS Game 5, he pitched the game of his life against the Cardinals, throwing eight innings to cement his legacy. More >

Video: 2004 NLCS Gm5: Backe throws eight shutout innings

Athletics: Howard Ehmke
As the story goes, when Ehmke, a washed-up spot starter, was called into manager Connie Mack’s office in August 1924, he was expecting to be notified of his release. But instead, the two made a deal: Ehmke would scout the Cubs while resting his sore arm for the rest of the regular season, and Mack would give him the start in Game 1 of the World Series. Well, he got that start, and he struck out a then-World Series record 13 batters against a lineup featuring future Hall of Famers Rogers Hornsby, Hack Wilson and Kiki Cuyler. More >

Blue Jays: Chris Colabello
Colabello’s brief tenure in Toronto was highlighted by playing a major role in helping the Blue Jays snap their 22-year playoff drought in 2015. An offseason waiver claim, he hit .321/.367/.520 in 101 games in the regular season and played a crucial role in Toronto’s playoff run. More >

Braves: Eddie Perez
When starting catcher Javy Lopez tore his ACL in July 1999, Perez, a career backup catcher, stepped into full-time duty and played a huge role in the Braves’ most recent run to the World Series. In the NLCS against the Mets, Perez was 10-for-20 with two homers that were both game-winning hits, earning him NLCS MVP honors. More >

Brewers: Ned Yost
Long before he was a manager, Yost was a backup catcher on the Brewers who saw very sporadic playing time, to the point where he didn’t even buy more of his own bats — he’d just grab an available one. On Sept. 29, 1982, using teammate Charlie Moore’s bat for his first plate appearance in 18 days, he launched a go-ahead three-run homer over the Green Monster to give Milwaukee a huge win in its quest for the AL East crown. More >

Cardinals: Jeff Suppan
Suppan was at his best for the Cardinals on the biggest stages. Two years after outdueling Roger Clemens to clinch the NL pennant, Suppan was huge for the Cards in their 2006 postseason run, winning NLCS MVP honors for his eight shutout innings and homer in Game 3 against the Mets before he escaped a bases-loaded jam in the sixth inning of Game 7 as part of seven strong innings for the eventual World Series champions. More >

Video: 2006 NLCS Gm7: Suppan stifles Mets over 7

Cubs: Randall Simon
The Cubs needed a left-handed bat who could play first base for their stretch run in 2003. In stepped Simon, picked up in an August trade with the Pirates to supplement the splashy acquisitions of Aramis Ramirez and Kenny Lofton. Simon hit .317 with runners in scoring position and gave the Cubs a loose, upbeat clubhouse presence, but Chicago ultimately dropped the NLCS to the Marlins in seven games. More >

D-backs: Craig Counsell
Everyone remembers Luis Gonzalez’s Game 7 walk-off against Mariano Rivera and the Yankees in the 2001 World Series. But for then-Arizona manager Bob Brenly, Counsell’s homer in Game 1 was right up there in importance as well. Counsell, the NLCS MVP, teed off against Mike Mussina in the first inning, giving a surge of confidence to his young organization and signaling that they could, in fact, go toe-to-toe with the vaunted Yanks. More >

Video: 2001 WS Gm1: Counsell’s homer ties game in 1st

Dodgers: Mickey Hatcher
Remember Kirk Gibson’s hobbled walk-off homer in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series? Hatcher was the guy that was starting at first in place of the injured Gibson, and he made the most of his opportunity, leading the club with five runs and five RBIs during the World Series, homering in Games 1 and 5, and hitting safely in each of the Dodgers’ final eight postseason games. More >

Giants: Edgar Renteria
The veteran Renteria gathered the Giants’ posi Cheap Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey tion players for an emotional speech late on Sept. 26, 2010, tearfully encouraging his teammates for a turnaround to the team’s shaky offense — he knew his career was in its final stages, and he wanted to go out a champion. It was a turning point. San Francisco’s bats woke up, and Renteria himself hit .412 with Men’s Nike Custom Made Kansas City Chiefs Elite Red Team Color NFL Jersey  six runs and six RBIs in the World Series, with the game-winning homer in the decisive Game 5. He won World Series MVP. More >

Indians: Jaret Wright
Wright’s rookie-season heroics have endured in Cleveland lore for two decades. In 1997, the then-21-year-old hurler helped the Tribe clinch a third straight AL Central title and went 3-0 in October, including a win in Game 4 of the World Series. More >

Mariners: Bob Wolcott
Wolcott didn’t make his Major League debut until mid-August of the Mariners’ memorable 1995 season, and he we wasn’t even on the roster for the ALDS against the Yankees. But the day before Game 1 of the ALCS against the Indians, the 22-year-old rookie got the call that he’d be starting, and he allowed two runs in seven innings to push Seattle to a series-opening win. More >

Marlins: Alex Gonzalez
The Marlins saw a 3-1 lead disappear in Game 4 of the 2003 World Series, and as they remained tied with the Yankees into the 12th inning, manager Jack McKeon asked his dugout for a big hit. Little did he know it would come from Gonzalez, a glove-first shortstop mired in a deep postseason slump. His walk-off shot carried just over a low section of the left-field wall to even the series at 2-2. More >

Video: 2003 WS Gm4: Gonzalez wins it with a walk-off homer

Mets: Donn Clendenon
After Clendenon was acquired in June 1969, his right-handed power bat and veteran leadership helped the “Miracle Mets” complete their memorable comeback. Despite not playing against the Braves in the NLCS, Clendenon provided an MVP effort in the Fall Classic against Baltimore, hitting tiebreaking homers in Games 2 and 4 and another long ball in the decisive Game 5. More >

Nationals: Jose Lobaton
Lobaton probably shouldn’t even have been playing in Game 2 of the 2016 NLDS. After starting catcher Wilson Ramos tore his ACL in September, Lobaton was part of a platoon behind the plate, but he wasn’t supposed to start against left-handers, in part due to an ankle injury that bothered him when swinging right-handed. But he got the nod against Rich Hill due to good career numbers against the southpaw, and he rewarded manager Dusty Baker with a clutch three-run homer that was the difference in a Nationals victory. More >

Video: Must C Clutch: Lobaton’s three-run HR gives Nats lead

Orioles: Delmon Young
Young fueled the underdog Orioles’ Game 2 victory in the 2014 ALDS with a pinch-hit three-run double that put Baltimore ahead, 7-6, at Camden Yards. “It’s still the loudest roar I think I’ve ever heard in real life,” said catcher Caleb Joseph, who was in the on-deck circle. More >

Padres: Sterling Hitchcock
Hitchcock didn’t start the 1998 season in the rotation for the star-studded Padres. But he ended the season by outdueling Randy Johnson, Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and David Cone in the playoffs. Hitchcock struck out 27 batters in two NLDS starts, beat Maddux in Game 3 of the NLCS, then struck out eight and had a critical hit in the clinching Game 6 before San Diego was swept by New York in the World Series. More >

Phillies: Eric Bruntlett
Bruntlett is most widely recognized for his unassisted triple play, but he instead likes to draw attention to the role he played in the Phillies’ 2008 World Series championship against Tampa Bay. The utility man scored two pivotal runs late in the series, including a walk-off run on a fielder’s choice in Game 3 and the go-ahead run in the Game 5 clincher. More >

Pirates: John Holdzkom
Everything happened really quickly for “Big John” Holdzkom during the 2014 season. In June, he was pitching for an independent league team in Amarillo, Texas. A little over two months later, after being spotted by a scout and pitching well at two levels of the Minor Leagues, Holdzkom was called up by the Pirates. He made eight scoreless appearances before he gave up a run and stabilized the Bucs’ bullpen down the stretch, eventually pitching in their NL Wild Card Game loss to the Giants. More >

Video: NL WC: Holdzkom records first postseason strikeout

Rangers: Bengie Molina
Molina’s iconic moment is enshrined with a statue outside the Texas Live! entertainment complex that celebrates the Rangers’ first trip to the World Series. It depicts Molina embracing reliever Neftali Feliz upon Texas clinching the 2010 ALCS. Molina was a steadying presence who brought out the best in a young and inexperienced pitching staff. More >

Rays: Dan Johnson
Johnson cemented his place in Rays history with some clutch home runs in pivotal matchups as part of Tampa Bay’s playoff runs in 2008 and ’11. In ’08, with the Rays surging out of nowhere to win the AL East crown, he hit a homer off Jonathan Papelbon on Sept. 9 to tie the Red Sox in the ninth and propel Tampa Bay to a critical win. And, of course, in the famed Game 162 in 2011, the Rays were down to their last out before Johnson homered to tie it and Evan Longoria eventually walked off into the playoffs in the 11th. More >

Video: NYY@TB: Johnson jacks a clutch game-tying homer

Red Sox: Dave Henderson
The 1986 Red Sox were led by Roger Clemens, who won both the AL MVP Award and the AL Cy Young Award, but Henderson forever endeared himself to the Boston faithful with his dramatic home run in Game 5 of the ALCS that helped spur their comeback from a 3-1 deficit against the Angels. More >

Reds: Billy Bates
The 5-foot-7, 155-pound Bates was on the Reds’ 1990 posteason roster mainly for his speed, so he was quite surprised when he was summoned to pinch-hit against future Hall of Famer Dennis Eckersley in the 10th inning of Game 2 of the World Series. He hit an infield single — his only hit in a Cincinnati uniform — and later came around to score on Joe Oliver’s walk-off single. The Reds went on to win the World Series, and Bates never again played in the Major Leagues thereafter. More >

Rockies: Tony Wolters
The Rockies’ biggest postseason hit of the decade came off the bat of a player from the very end of their bench. In the 13th inning of a nailbiter of a 2018 NL Wild Card Game, with Colorado having been held scoreless by the Cubs for the last 11 innings, Wolters recreated the old “Rocktober” magic. The reserve catcher, who’d been double-switched into the game in the 12th, knocked a two-out, two-strike tiebreaking hit up the middle off Chicago’s Kyle Hendricks to deliver the Rockies’ first playoff victory since 2009 and send them on to the Division Series to face the Brewers. More >

Royals: Chris Young
Young wasn’t even signed until a few weeks before the season began, but had a major impact on the Royals’ 2015 championship squad. Young posted a 2.87 ERA through 15 2/3 innings in the playoffs, including a win in relief in Game 1 of the World Series. More >

Video: MLB Now previews Young’s World Series Game 4 start

Tigers: Mickey Stanley
Hall of Famer Al Kaline’s return from injury in 1968 created a logjam in the Tigers’ lineup, but Stanley’s successful move from the outfield to shortstop allowed Detroit to get Kaline’s bat in the lineup for its World Series run. More >

Twins: Gene Larkin
Mostly a role player throughout his seven years with the Twins, Larkin’s hit off the bench in Game 7 of the 1991 World Series against the Braves clinched the franchise’s most recent title and solidified his place in Minnesota lore. “Obviously, it was a thrill of a lifetime and something you dream about when you first pick up a ball in the backyard,” Larkin said. More >

Video: 1991 WS Gm7: Larkin’s single wins series for Twins

White Sox: Geoff Blum
Blum needed only one at-bat in the 2005 World Series against Houston to become a postseason hero. He clubbed the game-winning home run to right field in Game 3 to put the White Sox one step closer to a sweep and their first championship in 88 years. More >

Yankees: Shane Spencer
The Yankees’ storied history is littered with Hall of Famers and some of the game’s iconic stars, but one of the most unexpected heroes emerged in 1998, when Spencer was dubbed “the home-run dispenser” by announcer John Sterling. Spencer, a rookie, went deep 10 times in a span of 54 plate appearances, including three grand slams, to end the season and added two more long balls in the ALDS. More >

Each MLB team’s Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey 2018 MVP

From familiar faces like Mike Trout, Paul Goldschmidt and Jose Abreu to relative newcomers to the spotlight like Blake Snell, Aaron Nola and Kyle Freeland, there was certainly no shortage of star power to go around the league in 2018.

Whether they were fueling postseason pushes, serving as veteran leaders on young teams or captivating fans with breakout campaigns, these standouts provided baseball fans around the country with the most exciting storylines of the regular season.

From familiar faces like Mike Trout, Paul Goldschmidt and Jose Abreu to relative newcomers to the spotlight like Blake Snell, Aaron Nola and Kyle Freeland, there was certainly no shortage of star power to go around the league in 2018.

Whether they were fueling postseason pushes, serving as veteran leaders on young teams or captivating fans with breakout campaigns, these standouts provided baseball fans around the country with the most exciting storylines of the regular season.

Here’s a look at every team’s 2018 MVP, in the words of all 30 MLB.com beat writers:

AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST

Blue Jays: Justin Smoak
Smoak wasn’t quite able to replicate his breakout 2017 campaign, but the veteran slugger has been the Blue Jays’ most consistent hitter from start to finish. The 31-year-old entered play on Wednesday with the team lead in home runs (25), RBIs (77) and OPS (.814). He was at the heart of Toronto’s lineup all year, and another solid season has all but officially guaranteed that his $7 million option for next year will be picked up by the Blue Jays.

Orioles: Trey Mancini
On a team decimated by trades and searching for an identity, Mancini has provided a second-half lift. The second-year player — who finished third in AL Rookie of the Year Award voting last year — entered Wednesday batting .278 with 11 homers in 59 games since the All-Star break, one long ball shy of his total from the first half, which spanned 91 games.

Rays: Blake Snell
Snell has a chance to do something only five other pitchers have done in the live-ball era (since 1920): finish with 21 wins and a sub-2.00 ERA at age 25 or younger. He would join Dwight Gooden, Vida Blue, Denny McLain, Dave McNally and Hal Newhouser. The lefty has made 26 starts this season in which he has allowed two runs or fewer and 20 starts of one run or fewer — both most in the Major Leagues, excluding “openers.”

Video: TB@TOR: Snell breaks a team record with 21st victory

Red Sox: Mookie Betts
So much for those who thought Betts had reached his peak two years ago when he finished second in the AL MVP Award voting to Mike Trout. After a tick downward in 2017, Betts has raised his game to the highest level of his career and taken the Red Sox with him for the ride. He has impacted his team in every way possible, hitting for average and power, stealing bases, playing brilliant defense and becoming a young leader in the clubhouse. Betts is a shoo-in to win his first batting title and has already achieved a career high in homers. He trails only Trout in on-base percentage and OPS. Betts also leads MLB in FanGraphs WAR.

Yankees: Didi Gregorius
Championed as “the captain of the infield” by manager Aaron Boone, Gregorius has provided the Yankees with leadership as well as above-average play on both sides of the ball. He has hit a career-high 27 homers, shattering his own record for the most by a Yanks shortstop, while committing just five errors. Gregorius slumped in May (.149 average) after a sensational April (1.156 OPS), but his numbers steadily improved each month thereafter.

AL CENTRAL

Indians: Jose Ramirez
This designation could go to either Ramirez or Francisco Lindor, and both could wind up in the top five in voting for the AL Most Valuable Player Award for the second straight year. Ramirez joined Joe Carter (1987) and Grady Sizemore (2008) as the only 30/30 players in Indians history. He also joined Barry Bonds, Jeff Bagwell and Bobby Abreu as the only hitters in MLB history to have 100 walks, 100 RBIs and 100 runs to go along with the 30 homers and 30 steals. Ramirez has rated as baseball’s top baserunner, and for the second year in a row, he has bounced between third base and second base defensively.

Video: Ramirez makes history, joins the exclusive 30-30 club

Royals: Whit Merrifield
Merrifield has emerged as one of the most dynamic offensive weapons in the league. He’ll likely win his second straight stolen-base title, and he has a chance to lead the AL (maybe even the Majors) in hits. All that athleticism shows up defensively as well, as Merrifield has turned into a premier super-utility man, ranging from center field to second base to first base. He’s a manager’s dream because of his versatility.

Tigers: Nicholas Castellanos
Considering what was around him in the Tigers’ lineup, Castellanos had one of the best seasons in a Detroit uniform since Miguel Cabrera‘s prime. He not only has career bests in average, slugging, on-base, OPS, hits and runs scored, but he’s also put himself among the AL’s top 10 in total bases, runs created, weighted on-base average, and nearly there in win probability added. Castellanos has taken Cabrera’s seat as the center of Detroit’s offense.

Twins: Eddie Rosario
Rosario had a breakout season offensively and was the Twins’ best all-around player, hitting .288/.323/.479 with 24 homers, 31 doubles and 77 RBIs in 138 games before suffering a season-ending quad injury in mid-September. He was also a  Cheap Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey solid defender in left field, using his strong arm to rack up nine outfield assists. Rosario still has room to improve his plate discipline, but is among the best bad-ball hitters in baseball with a Major League-high 10 of his homers coming on pitches out of the zone, per Statcast™.

Video: OAK@MIN: Rosario nabs Olson at home on 101-mph throw

White Sox: Jose Abreu
For the first time in Abreu’s five years with the White Sox, the first baseman failed to reach at least 25 home runs, 100 RBIs and a .290 average. Abreu lost all but six games after Aug. 20 due to surgery to relieve pain from testicular torsion and an infection in his right thigh, but he still was the most consistent force in the White Sox lineup. Abreu knocked out 22 homers and 36 doubles and drove in 78 runs to go along with a .473 slugging percentage and a .798 OPS.

AL WEST

Angels: Mike Trout
The best player in baseball keeps finding ways to get better. Trout, a two-time AL MVP Award winner, is having his best season to date, leading the Majors in on-base percentage, OPS and intentional walks, and ranking second in slugging percentage and WAR. Trout also made a concerted effort to improve his defense in center field and continues to be a burner on the basepaths. The 27-year-old star is a perennial AL MVP Award candidate, but his case this year will likely be hurt by the fact that the Angels are set to miss the playoffs for a fourth consecutive season.

Astros: Alex Bregman
With 2017 AL MVP Award winner Jose Altuve not able to duplicate his tremendous numbers from a year ago, Bregman emerged as the Astros’ most dangerous offensive player with a historic season at the plate. He joined Lance Berkman as the only Houston players to reach 50 doubles, 100 RBIs and  Custom Chiefs Jersey 100 runs in a season and is the first player in MLB history to have at least 50 doubles and 30 homers while playing the majority of his games at third base.

Athletics: Khris Davis
Davis no longer plays the field, but the impact he has on the A’s lineup as designated hitter is invaluable. He’s their main power source — they went lif Men’s Nike Custom Made Kansas City Chiefs Elite Red Team Color NFL Jersey eless at the plate when he was on the DL this year, going 3-6 without him — and he just so happens to be baseball’s home run leader, making him worthy of AL MVP Award consideration. Davis, who has launched more long balls since the advent of 2016 than any other player, at least belongs in the conversation.

Video: OAK@SEA: Davis crushes his 46th home run to center

Mariners: Mitch Haniger
While a case certainly can be made for closer Edwin Diaz‘s value, given that he’s saved two-thirds of the wins for a team that made a living on one-run victories for much of the year, Haniger emerged as Seattle’s best everyday player with a breakout season. The first-time All-Star kicked his game up further with a strong stretch run both offensively and in right field, where he’s tops in the Majors with 12 assists. The 27-year-old is the second Mariners outfielder with 35-plus doubles, 25-plus homers and 90-plus RBIs in a season, joining Ken Griffey Jr. (1992 and ’93).

Rangers: Shin-Soo Choo
Choo was an All-Star for the first time in his career and the Rangers’ only representative. His high on-base percentage and ability to hit anywhere in the order were big assets to Texas’ lineup. Joey Gallo had big home run and RBI totals, but Choo set the tone for the Rangers’ offense, played solid defense so that Adrian Beltre could DH and emerged as a strong clubhouse leader on a young team.

NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST

Braves: Freddie Freeman
As great as Ronald Acuna Jr. was in the second half, his six-week stretch of dominance did not trump the overall value of Freeman, who was arguably the leading NL MVP Award candidate before entering a three-week slump in mid-August. Freeman’s power production dropped over the final few months, but his consistency maximized the value produced by Nick Markakis and Ozzie Albies, fellow All-Stars who also produced MVP-caliber production during the first half.

Video: PHI@ATL: Freeman, Markakis exit to standing ovation

Marlins: J.T. Realmuto
The last remaining core player from an explosive 2017 lineup, Realmuto not only by default became the face of the franchise, but he’s also made the case that he’s the best catcher in the Majors. The 27-year-old leads his position in many major statistical categories. Realmuto was named to his first All-Star Game this year, and playing on a last-place team, the Oklahoma native embraced a leadership role on a young squad.

Mets: Jacob deGrom
The likely NL Cy Young Award winner, deGrom will appear on many NL MVP Award ballots as well. He is on pace to lead the NL in ERA by more than half a run, after posting the most consecutive quality starts in a season in Major League history. No NL hitter is close to deGrom in either FanGraphs’ or Baseball Reference’s calculation of WAR.

Nationals: Max Scherzer
The Nationals have endured injuries and inconsistencies from so much of their roster, but Scherzer remained the one steady presence every fifth day. He is one of the front-runners for the NL Cy Young Award and, like deGrom, will appear on some NL MVP Award ballots after leading the NL in wins and strikeouts and becoming just the sixth pitcher since 1990 to record 300 strikeouts in a single season.

Video: Must C Classic: Scherzer fans Dean for 300th K of ’18

Phillies: Aaron Nola
The Phillies had the second-best record in the NL and held first place in the NL East as late as Aug. 11 mostly because of their starting pitching. Nola led the way, establishing himself not only as the Phils’ ace, but as one of the best starting pitchers in baseball. Entering Wednesday, Nola’s bWAR (9.4) was fifth in the Majors. Only Betts (10.7), Trout (10.1) Scherzer (9.7) and deGrom (9.6) had higher marks.

NL CENTRAL

Brewers: Christian Yelich
Traditional numbers, newer numbers or narrative — by nearly any definition, Yelich is the guy, not just for the Brewers, but perhaps in the whole NL. He’s had a career year at the plate, hitting for average, hitting for power and getting on base. He’s also played strong defense, contributed as an exceptional baserunner and carried a contending team for stretches of the season.

Video: Yelich makes history with 2nd cycle of ’18 vs. Reds

Cardinals: Matt Carpenter
No player was more integral to the Cardinals’ second-half surge than Carpenter, whose white-hot summer pulled them back into contention almost single-handedly. St. Louis’ leadoff hitter rebounded from a horrible start to put himself squarely in the NL MVP Award conversation. Carpenter leads the NL in homers and ranks among the leaders in a slew of major categories, including runs, slugging, OPS, wRC+ and WAR.

Cubs: Javier Baez
Baez began this season batting eighth for the Cubs, quickly moved up and now finds himself one of the top NL MVP Award candidates. He has set career highs in nearly every offensive category, and has done so while moving around the infield. Manager Joe Maddon says Baez is the best second baseman in the NL — and he may be the best shortstop, too. He is the Cubs’ quarterback. “El Mago” has had a magical year.

Pirates: Jameson Taillon
The Pirates have their ace. After a few rough outings early in the season, Taillon has put together 21 straight starts of three earned runs or fewer, a stretch surpassed by only deGrom this season. The former No. 2 overall pick leads Pittsburgh with 4.3 bWAR, and his emergence — along with the success of Trevor Williams — gives the Bucs hope heading into next season.

Video: KC@PIT: Taillon sets career high with 11 K’s

Reds: Eugenio Suarez
Signed to a seven-year, $66 million contract extension in March, Suarez backed it up with his biggest season yet, and is among the NL leaders in home runs and RBIs. In July, he tied a franchise record with home runs in five consecutive games. Besides having a career year at the plate, the 27-year-old was again exceptional defensively at third base and could make both the routine and superlative plays. Suarez’s numbers might have been more robust had he not missed 16 games in April with a fractured thumb. He was certainly missed, as Cincinnati went 3-13 without his contributions.

NL WEST

D-backs: Paul Goldschmidt
You could have gotten really good odds on May 22 that Arizona’s MVP would be anyone other than Goldschmidt, as the six-time All-Star was hitting .198 at the time. Since then, though, he’s gone on a tear and will finish the year with his usual outstanding numbers. Beyond the offensive numbers, Goldschmidt brings Gold Glove defense at first base and is an adept baserunner.

Dodgers: Justin Turner
Turner missed the first six weeks with a broken wrist and wasn’t whole for another six weeks. That said, since the All-Star break, he’s been the real Justin Turner, the most consistent offensive bat and a leader in the clubhouse. On a team that platoons almost everywhere, he is one player manager Dave Roberts hates to leave out of the lineup.

Video: LAD@COL: Turner triple short of cycle in 4-hit game

Giants: Brandon Crawford
Though Crawford fell short of his peak offensive production, he was San Francisco’s top hitter early in the season, before the club began to struggle at the plate collectively. Crawford was torrid in May (.412/.446/.618) and June (.326/.425/.584) to help the Giants finish 29-26 in that span. Left knee soreness hampered Crawford at the plate and in the field, though the three-time Gold Glove-winning shortstop continued to make captivating plays throughout the season.

Padres: Kirby Yates
The Padres’ offense has been inconsistent, and the few hitters who have starred have done so in limited plate appearances. The rotation, meanwhile, has been in a state of flux with rookie after rookie debuting. Through it all, Yates has been the anchor to one of the league’s best bullpens. He’s upped his strikeout rate, lowered his walk rate and honed his splitter to the point where it’s been nearly unhittable this season.

Rockies: Kyle Freeland
Yes, this one is outside the BBWAA box, but given the 26-season history of baseball at a mile high, it makes total sense. Reading Freeland’s stats is like playing that game with the fortune cookie message. Read, then say either “for the Rockies” or “at Coors Field.” Going into Friday night’s final regular-season start against the Nationals, he had a 2.84 ERA (club record: Ubaldo Jimenez, 2.88 in 2010), a 2.36 home ERA and is 8-1 with a 2.45 ERA in 13 starts after the All-Star break. And how’s this for picking up his teammates? Freeland hasn’t given up an unearned run, meaning he doesn’t let miscues become costly.

Video: LAD@COL: Freeland strikes out 10 over 7 2-run innings

Brewers clinch first p Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey layoff berth since 2011

ST. LOUIS — Thanks in no small part to a signing and a trade on the same day in January, the Brewers will play baseball into October.

Lorenzo Cain, Christian Yelich & Co. punched their tickets to the postseason on Wednesday night with a 2-1 win over the Cardinals at Busch Stadium, completing a three-game sweep that guaranteed at least a spot in next week’s National League Wild Card Game. With St. Louis’ loss, the Cubs are in, too.

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ST. LOUIS — Thanks in no small part to a signing and a trade on the same day in January, the Brewers will play baseball into October.

Lorenzo Cain, Christian Yelich & Co. punched their tickets to the postseason on Wednesday night with a 2-1 win over the Cardinals at Busch Stadium, completing a three-game sweep that guaranteed at least a spot in next week’s National League Wild Card Game. With St. Louis’ loss, the Cubs are in, too.

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For the fifth time in 50 seasons as a franchise, and the first time since 2011, the Brewers are going to the postseason.

Shop for Brewers postseason gear | Top 10 Brewers moments in 2018 | Yelich pens letter to fans

“It’s so hard to do this,” Yelich said. “Winning a Major League Baseball game is so tough, and for us to be able to do it that many times and put us in a position to be in the postseason is really special. We’ve got an awesome opportunity ahead of us.

“Hopefully, this is the first of many celebrations.”

The Brewers hope to take another champagne shower this weekend, but they will need some help. The NL Central-leading Cubs beat the Pirates in extra innings to remain a half-game ahead of the Brewers in the division standings. Chicago has four games remaining, Milwaukee has three. With the Rockies’ victory and Dodgers’ loss, the Brewers are guaranteed to host the Wild Card Game if they don’t win the division.

Still, with those games against the Tigers still to play, the Brewers paused Wednesday night to drench the same clubhouse in which they sulked one year ago after being eliminated from playoff contention by the Cardinals on the season’s penultimate day.

Tweet from @Brewers: Family. #OurCrewOurOctober pic.twitter.com/gxbQBzbLBE

When players armed with goggles as well as postseason T-shirts and caps gathered in the clubhouse, Brewers manager Craig Counsell gave that history lesson to those who hadn’t lived it.

“We had a tough moment here last year, a disappointing moment. And we got to celebrate here this year,” Counsell said. “It’s a moment for us to blow off some steam and be proud of how this team has come together and how they’ve played and how they’ve competed and treated each other. We know we’ve got a big weekend ahead of us — a huge weekend ahead of us.”

Yelich walked in all five plate appearances and scored twice after tormenting the Cardinals in the first two games of the series, Travis Shaw hit a pair of RBI singles, and Jhoulys Chacin allowed only one Cardinals hit and one run in five effective innings. That left the game in the hands of a stout bullpen that locked down the Brewers’ first sweep at Busch Stadium since 2009.

Video: MIL@STL: Chacin strikes out 3, earns win vs. Cards

It nearly slipped away, until a slip saved it. More on that in a moment.

“You need some breaks,” Counsell said. “If you’re going to win the World Series, you need to catch a break, man. We’ll take some breaks along the way, for sure.”

It was clear that someone besides Yelich was going to have to beat the Cardinals, because four different pitchers walked him. That someone was Shaw, who singled sharply to right field for a 1-0 lead in the third inning, then blooped another RBI single to left in the fifth.

Video: MIL@STL: Shaw picks up 2nd RBI with a single to left

“‘Yeli’ did another thing tonight that was kind of amazing, in walking five times,” Counsell said. “He does something every night that’s different. He got a treatment — I’ve used Barry Bonds in the last couple of days with some other writers, and his second half, that’s what it’s looked like to me. It’s been that impressive, where guys in the clubhouse are marveling at it. Travis came up big tonight.”

Added Shaw: “It was obvious they weren’t going to pitch to him. They made that mistake too many times before this season. Somebody else was going to do it. I was just able to get a couple hits.”

“Travis stepped up huge tonight,” Yelich said. “Chacin threw a hell of a game. And then the bullpen came in. It’s only fitting that they came in and shut the door, because that’s what they’ve done all year. It was an awesome moment.”

It was a moment general manager David Stearns had in mind when he shocked the baseball world by acquiring both Cain and Yelich on the same day — Jan. 25. Cain signed the richest free-agent contract in Brewers history, five years and $80 million, and gave Milwaukee an elite defensive center fielder, a  Cheap Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey brilliant baserunner and an on-base machine at the top of the order. Yelich cost four premium prosp Custom Chiefs Jerseys ects in a blockbuster trade with the Marlins, and essentially carried the offense after the All-Star break while rising to the top of the list of NL MVP Award contenders.

Video: MIL@STL: Yelich draws a career-high 5 walks in win

Stearns made other shrewd moves, signing Chacin for two years and $15.5 million instead of emptying the coffers for Yu Darvish or Jake Arrieta, and making a slew of in-season trades headlined by a deal with the Royals for Mike Moustakas. Counsell managed all of those extra pieces down the stretch, including a bullpen headlined by Josh Hader and Jeremy Jeffress that proved the team’s clear strength.

The Brewers started strong and finished strong, overcoming a period in the middle in which they lost seven straight games and nine of 11 leading into and coming out of the All-Star break, including a dismal five-game sweep in Pittsburgh that finished a stretch of 21 games in 20 days.

But Milwaukee found its footing right here in St. Louis, winning behind Chacin on Aug. 19 to begin a stretch in which the club won 24 of 34 games through Wednesday and took 10 of 11 series.

Video: MIL@STL: Ryan Braun on reaching 3rd postseason

“As a team, that was the toughest stretch,” said Ryan Braun, the last remaining player from Milwaukee’s 2011 playoff team. “I think we’ve done a good job of being able to turn the page, to move on, to focus on the task at hand, the next day’s game, recognizing that you can’t ever go back and change those losses. We can’t go back and play better or do anything differently.

“We just move forward and continue to play good — and ultimately, it’s our depth. There’s a lot of guys who are contributing to our success. We have so many guys in the bullpen, all of our starters have been underappreciated, and as an offense, it’s a lot of different guys that can help carry us on any given night.”

There are more important nights ahead.

“If you could go back in time eight, nine months, and realize what was in front of you and what you were going to experience…” Yelich said while being showered with champagne. “It was special. We’re excited to be coming home to Milwaukee.”

Video: MIL@STL: Yelich on Brewers reaching the postseason

MOMENT THAT MATTERED
“Extreme panic,” is how catcher Erik Kratz described the game’s decisive moment in the eighth inning. The Cardinals’ best hitter, Matt Carpenter, had just worked a nine-pitch walk from Hader with two outs. St. Louis sent Adolis Garcia out to pinch-run, and the Brewers called for closer Jeffress, who’d pitched only once in the previous 12 days and was unavailable for a save situation Monday because of neck spasms.

Jose Martinez hit a chopper along the third-base line that Moustakas fielded, then bounced an off-balance throw past Shaw at first base. Garcia started sprinting around the bases, but he slipped around third while Brewers second baseman Hernan Perez — who’d just entered the game — fired a throw home. Kratz tagged at the air, then recovered in time to find Garcia and apply the tag the Brewers needed for the inning-ending out.

The lead was saved.

Video: Must C Clinch: Brewers clinch on Cardinals’ gaffe

“I was there for that moment. I made a good throw to home plate, and we made the out,” Perez said. “Like Counsell told me early in September, I’m going to be a part of the team. I’m going to make a big [difference] in a game. When I made that play, I remembered what he told me. I said, ‘We’re here.'”

Counsell said the play was made when Perez hustled after the baseball. But also credit Kratz, who did everything right to get in position, then didn’t panic when the runner wasn’t there to tag, even if he was feeling it on the inside.

Kratz said he heard the crowd groan and knew something had happened. He just had no idea what it was.

“It’s extreme panic. Extreme panic,” Kratz said. “It’s not the panic that you ever want, but I knew I had the ball and I knew the guys were there if I had to throw it to third. You don’t ever think he’s going to fall. But we got the out.”

Cardinals manager Mike Shildt was asked what he said to a despondent Garcia.

“I just pat him on the back,” Shildt said. “Look, guy is making a physical error giving everything he’s got. Feet go out from under him. Those things happen. All you can do is support him. He’s our teammate.”

Video: MIL@STL: Counsell on team clinching playoff berth

HE SAID IT
“I’m happy for [the players], and I’m happy for the fans of the Brewers. From the season-ticket holders to the people in the retirement home who get three hours a night watching Brewers games. For Bob Uecker, who gets a chance to call a playoff game again. That’s the thrill for me. … I should have left a space in there.”
— Counsell

Video: MIL@STL: Brewers broadcaster Bob Uecker on postseason

UP NEXT
The Brewers will close out the regular season at home against an old American League rival, the Tigers, who visit Milwaukee for the first time since 2006 beginning at 7:10 p.m. CT Friday. Zach Davies starts for the Brewers opposite Auburndale, Wis., native Jordan Zimmermann, who has a 3.80 ERA in front of friends and family in four career starts at Miller Park but hasn’t pitched there since 2015.

Adam McCalvy has covered the Brewers for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @AdamMcCalvy and like him on Facebook.


Milwaukee Brewers,
Jhoulys Chacin,
Jeremy Jeffress,
Travis Shaw,
Christian Yelich

Jesus Aguilar pi Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey cks his pitcher in HR Derby

PITTSBURGH — Brewers first-base coach Carlos Subero has never been in a home run derby at any level. He’s never been to an MLB All-Star Game, either.

Both of those things will change next week as first baseman Jesus Aguilar has chosen Subero to pitch to him in the T-Mobile Home Run Derby, which will air Monday, July 16, at 7 p.m. CT on ESPN.

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PITTSBURGH — Brewers first-base coach Carlos Subero has never been in a home run derby at any level. He’s never been to an MLB All-Star Game, either.

Both of those things will change next week as first baseman Jesus Aguilar has chosen Subero to pitch to him in the T-Mobile Home Run Derby, which will a Men’s Nike Custom Made Kansas City Chiefs Elite Red Team Color NFL Jersey ir Monday, July 16, at 7 p.m. CT on ESPN.:: Complete Home Run Derby coverage ::

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“In the plane, [Aguilar] just told me, ‘Hey, we’re going to the All-Star Game and the Home Run Derby, so get ready,'” Subero said.

Aguilar’s decision was heavily influenced by the familiarity he has with Subero, who has nearly two years of experience throwing pitches to Aguilar in practice and before games.

“He’s been throwing BP for me for almost two years,” Aguilar said. “So he kind of knows me Custom Chiefs Jersey  good. That’s why I chose him.”

Subero was one of the first guys to recommend the Brewers pursue Aguilar when the Indians designated him for assignment in January 2017. He texted Brewers manager Craig Counsell immediately and was thrilled when Milwaukee claimed him off waivers a week later.

Aguilar entered play on Friday with a National League-best 24 home runs in 83 games after slugging just 16 home runs over 133 games in 2016. He was tabbed the No. 1 seed in the Home Run Derby.

“I’m real happy for Jesus,” Subero said. “It’s an honor any time you can go to an All-Star Game and help somebody do something. Hopefully we go and win it, and he has a good time.”

Suter to start Game 2 on Saturday
Counsell announced on Friday afternoon that left-hander Brent Suter is scheduled to be activated from the 10-day disabled list on Saturday to start Game 2 of the straight doubleheader against the Pirates.

“In Miami, Brent felt great,” Counsell said. “He threw a bullpen on Wednesday that went very well. He’s been healthy, really, for this whole week. We were just kind of making sure every day he came back and felt good.”

Video: STL@MIL: Suter holds Cards to 2 runs over 7 innings

Suter’s disabled list assignment was made retroactive to July 3 as he dealt with left forearm tightness. The southpaw has gone 8-5 this season while posting a 4.53 ERA and 1.189 WHIP over 93 1/3 innings.

Woodruff recalled, Houser optioned
Prior to playing their 18th game in as many days on Friday, the Brewers continued to exchange arms by recalling right-hander Brandon Woodruff from Triple-A Colorado Springs and optioning righty Adrian Houser to Colorado Springs.

Houser struggled in Thursday night’s loss to the Pirates, as he allowed four earned runs on five hits over two innings.

Woodruff has seen time in both the starting role and as a reliever for the Brewers this year. His last outing came against the Phillies on June 10, when he got the start and earned a no-decision after allowing one unearned run and limiting Philadelphia to one hit over four innings.

Woodruff pitched three shutout innings in Friday’s loss to the Pirates, allowing only one hit while striking out three and hitting his first career home run.

Mason Wittner is a reporter for MLB.com based in Pittsburgh.


Milwaukee Brewers,
Jesus Aguilar

Adam Haseley leads top pr Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey ospect performers

Here’s MLB Pipeline’s roundup of the top prospect performances in the Minor Leagues on Friday.

Adam Haseley had so much fun hitting his first Double-A homer that he promptly went back and hit his second.

Here’s MLB Pipeline’s roundup of the top prospect performances in the Minor Leagues on Friday.

Adam Haseley had so much fun hitting his first Double-A homer that he promptly went back and hit his second.

Haseley, the Phillies No. 4 prospect, led Double-A Reading to a 5-4 win over Bowie with a pair of homers as part of a 3-for-4, three-RBI performance.

 Haseley’s first Double-A homer

The No. 79 overall prospect was promoted to Double-A on Tuesday and is 4-for-8 in the two games since. Haseley led off Friday’s game with a solo homer and then extended the Fightin Phils lead with a two-run blast in the third, marking the first two-homer game of his career.

 Haseley homers again

Prior to his promotion the 2017 first-round Draft pick was hitting .299/.342/.413 through 79 games with Class A Advanced Clearwater.

Other top prospect performances from Friday’s action:

• No. 30 overall prospect Keston Hiura (Brewers’ No. 1) was a perfect 4-for-4 at the plate for Double-A Biloxi. The 21-year-old came up clutch in the early stages of the game, collecting an RBI single in the first and hitting a solo Custom Chiefs Jerseys  homer in the third. Hiura added two more singles later in the game and also scored a pair of runs.

Hiura goes yard

• No. 73 overall prospect Stephen Gonsalves (Twins’ No. 4) put together another strong start for Triple-A Rochester. Gonsalves, who has surrendered one earned run or less in five straight starts, struck out five and gave up one run on two hits over 5 2/3 innings. The lefty has struggled with command recently and walked two while throwing 68 of his 102 pitches for strikes.

:: Complete prospect coverage ::

• No. 98 overall prospect Logan Allen (Padres’ No. 9) fell one out shy of his first career complete game, but still picked up the win for Double-A San Antonio. Allen, who threw 6 2/3 innings, yielded one run on three hits. The 21-year-old walked one, struc Men’s Nike Custom Made Kansas City Chiefs Elite Red Team Color NFL Jersey k out four and threw 77 of his 108 pitches for strikes. In the second half of the doubleheader, Chris Paddack (No. 96 overall, Padres’ No. 8) spun his first career complete game, but was stuck with a loss. The right-hander gave up two runs on two hits over six innings.

Astros No. 15 prospect Framber Valdez notched double-digit strikeouts for the second time this season with Double-A Corpus Christi. The left-hander struck out the side in Cheap Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey  the third and recorded at least one strikeout in each of the six innings he pitched. Valdez finished with 10 strikeouts and didn’t allow a run as he worked around three hits and a trio of walks.

Mariners No. 4 prospect Julio Rodriguez put together another multhit effort as his career gets off to a fast start in the Dominican Summer League. The 17-year-old went 2-for-4 with a homer, his second, and is slashing .336/.424/.507 through 35 games.

Pirates No. 24 prospect Brandon Waddell set a career high as he notched nine strikeouts in a win for Triple-A Indianapolis. Waddell, who surrendered just two hits over seven scoreless innings, threw 59 of his 91 pitches for strikes in what was his best appearance since he was promoted to Indianapolis in late May.

Waddell’s ninth strikeout

Rangers No. 4 prospect Hans Crouse fired the best start of his young career for Class A Short Season Spokane. The 2017 second-rounder set career highs as he struck out 11 over seven innings. Crouse was incredibly  Custom Chiefs Jersey dominant on the mound as he didn’t issue a walk, gave up one hit and threw 58 of his 82 pitches for strikes in the scoreless outing.

Red Sox No. 7 prospect Darwinzon Hernandez put together another string of zeros for Class A Advanced Salem. Hernandez extended his scoreless streak to 16 2/3 innings after throwing five scoreless frames in what was his third straight scoreless start. The lefty walked two and scattered six hits while fanning six and lowering his ERA to 4.04.

• Blue Jays first-round pick Jordan Groshans turned in the first three-hit game of his career, going 3-for-4 with a pair of doubles in the Rookie-level GCL. Groshans also drove in five runs, a career high, and boosted his average to .354.

• Marlins Draft picks Osiris Johnson (2nd-round, 53rd overall) and Will Banfield (Competitive Balance Round B, 69th overall) combined for five hits and four RBIs to lead the GCL Marlins to a win. Johnson, who has hits in six of his eight professional games, went 2-for-4 with two RBIs, while Banfield went 3-for-5 with a pair of RBIs.

William Boor is a reporter for MLB Pipeline. Follow him on Twitter at @wboor.

Brewers place Eric Thames, Junior Guerra o Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey n DL

PITTSBURGH — The Brewers made a series of roster moves on Saturday morning, starting with placing Eric Thames and Junior Guerra on the 10-day disabled list.

Thames exited Friday night’s game against the Pirates in the third inning with right hamstring tightness. He said after the game that the issue initially occurred on Thursday, but he thought he could play through it. He felt it more when he tried to run during the game on Friday, however, and realized he wouldn’t able to go for at least a few days. Cheap Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey 

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PITTSBURGH — The Brewers made a series of roster moves on Saturday morning, starting with placing Eric Thames and Junior Guerra on the 10-day disabled list.

Thames exited Friday night’s game against the Pirates in the third inning with right hamstring tightness. He said after the game that the issue initially occurred on Thursday, but he thought he could play through it. He felt it more when he tried to run during the game on Friday, however, and realized he wouldn’t able to go for at least a few days.

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“He’s not available to play these two days,” Brewers manager Craig Counsell said. “He can’t run right now. We’ll see. Hopefully Eric, after these two days and the four days over the break, is doing well.”

Video: MIL@PIT: Thames leaves the game with hip tightness

Counsell said they will re-evaluate Thames’ status in Los Angeles next Thursday to estimate a timetable for his return.

Guerr Customized Chiefs Jersey For Sale a started for the Brewers on Friday, and he appeared to have very little command of his pitches as he allowed a season-high six runs over four innings. Counsell said Saturday that Guerra dealt with a right forearm issue before his previous start, but it seemed to resolve itself as the week progressed before affecting the right-hander once again.

Video: MIL@PIT: Guerra K’s Mercer in the 2nd

“He’s at less than full strength right now,” Counsell said. “We’re going to have to give him a break. And I think it’s the cautious thing to do, but I think it’s the right thing to do.”

Milwaukee subsequently reinstated left-hander Brent Suter from the 10-day DL to start Game 2 of Saturday’s doubleheader with the Pirates, and it recalled Nate Orf from Triple-A Colorado Springs. Orf pinch-hit in the top of the ninth inning in Game 1 on Saturday, but he grounded into a forceout. The Brewers lost, 2-1.

Video: ATL@MIL: Wilkerson strikes out Swanson in the 4th

Wilkerson tabbed as 26th man

The Brewers were allotted a 26th man for Saturday’s scheduled doubleheader with the Pirates, and they elected to add right-hander Aaron Wilkerson.

Wilkerson’s last outing with the Major League club came on July 7, when he surrendered a pair of runs over five innings against the Braves and earned a loss. His addition wi Men’s Nike Custom Made Kansas City Chiefs Elite Red Team Color NFL Jersey ll bolster the bullpen as the Brewers play games 19 and 20 over a 19-day stretch on Saturday.

“We’ve got 10 guys in the bullpen right now,” Counsell said. “[Brandon Woodruff] is not going to pitch, so we’ve got nine able arms today. We’re in good shape down in the bullpen.”

Mason Wittner is a reporter for MLB.com.


Milwaukee Brewers,
Junior Guerra,
Eric Thames

Junior Guerra stru Custom Kansas City Chiefs Jersey ggles spell Brewers’ loss

PITTSBURGH — Junior Guerra has been one of the most consistent arms in the Brewers’ rotation this season. The right-hander entered Friday with the second-lowest ERA among Milwaukee’s everyday starters and had earned a win in each of his last three starts.

Guerra’s winning streak came to an abrupt end against the Pirates on Friday when he allowed a season-high six earned runs on nine hits in the Brewers’ 7-3 loss to the Pirates at PNC Park. Milwaukee has now lost three straight games and five of its last seven.

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PITTSBURGH — Junior Guerra has been one of the most consistent arms in the Brewers’ rotation this season. The right-hander entered Friday with the second-lowest ERA among Milwaukee’s everyday starters and had earned a win in each of his last three starts.

Guerra’s winning streak came to an abrupt end against the Pirates on Friday when he allowed a season-high six earned runs on nine hits in the Brewers’ 7-3 loss to the Pirates at PNC Park. Milwaukee has now lost three straight games and five of its last seven.

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Friday marked the first time Guerra has allowed more than five earned  Customized Chiefs Jersey For Sale runs since allowing eight against the Reds on June 27, 2017. He’s now surrendered five or more earned runs just twice through 18 starts this season, with the first also coming against the Pirates on May 4.

Video: MIL@PIT: Guerra K’s Mercer in the 2nd

“It was just a rough outing for him,” Brewers manager Craig Counsell said. “They swung the bats well against him. A lot of balls in the middle that got hit. Just one that he’s got to wipe out.”

Guerra’s struggles began in the first inning as he opened the game with an eight-pitch battle against Corey Dickerson, before hanging a two-seam fastball that resulted in a leadoff double.The Pirates had five more hits in the first — each coming off the two-seamer — and plated three runs via a Gregory Polanco sacrifice fly, Colin Moran RBI single and Josh Bell RBI double.

“I don’t think he had great command of the fastball,” Counsell said. “Especially early in the game, that’s the pitch he needs to get going. I never thought he got his fastball going as much as anything today.”

After two quick groundouts to start the third inning, the Pirates continued to attack Guerra. Moran jumped on a first-pitch hanging slider and lined a single to right field. In the ensuing at-bat, Guerra hung a two-seam fastball over the middle of the plate that Bell slapped to center field to drive in Moran. He then walked Josh Harrison before giving up an RBI double to Jordy Mercer on a first-pitch fastball.

Guerra allowed the final hit of his outing in the fourth, when he placed his fastball just over the middle of the plate to Polanco, who made him pay by hitting a 393-foot home run to right-center field and increasing Milwaukee’s deficit to five runs.

Video: MIL@PIT: Polanco belts a solo homer in the 4th

The Brewers’ bullpen provided a silver lining on Friday as Brandon Woodruff — who was recalled from Triple-A Colorado Springs on Friday — was brilliant. The right-hander pitched three scoreless innings of relief, allowing just one hit while striking out three. He also crushed the first home run of his career in the sixth inning.

“He was dynamite,” Counsell said. “He threw the ball really well. His changeup was really good. Very good command. With the fastball away to lefties, I thought he did an excellent job.”

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Trailing by three in the eighth inning, Hernan Perez and Lorenzo Cain hit back-to-back singles to bring the tying run to the plate with one out. Christian Yelich lined o Custom Chiefs Jersey ut to left field in the ensuing at-bat, and Jesus Aguilar flew out to left to end the inning before the Brewers could capitalize.

Video: MIL@PIT: Crick retires Aguilar to escape jam in 8th

YOU GOTTA SEE THIS
Good Wood-ruff: Woodruff, who bats left-handed despite throwing the ball right-handed, squared off against Pirates right-hander Nick Kingham to lead off the sixth inning. After fouling away the first pitch of the at-bat, Woodruff connected on a 91.5-mph four-seam fastball and drove it into the elevated stands in right field for the first home run of his MLB career.

“That’s something not everybody, especially a pitcher, gets to do,” Woodruff said. “It’s definitely special.”

Video: MIL@PIT: Woodruff belts a solo homer in the 6th

“Two good swings,” Kingham said. “The first one he fouled off down the line. Opened my eyes a bit, and then we called fastball in. And so I’m like, ‘You know, let’s see if he can get to it.’ And he got to it. So, good for him. He put a good swing on it. It was a good pitch, leaked over a little bit, but he did what you’re supposed to do with it. Really good piece of hitting.”

HE SAID IT
“We’re 90 games in, and we’ve got 70 to go. It’s no time to be tired.”–Counsell, on if he thinks his team is fatigued

UP NEXT
The Brewers and Pirates will play a straight doubleheader at PNC Park on Saturday to make up for a rainout on June 20. Right-hander Chase Anderson (6-6, 3.81 ERA) will take the mound against Ivan Nova (5-6, 4.50) in Game 1 at 11:35 a.m. CT. Lefty Brent Suter (8-5, 4.53) will be activated from the disabled list to start Game 2, facing Clay Holmes (0-1, 7.11).

Mason Wittner is a reporter for MLB.com based in Pittsburgh.


Milwaukee Brewers,
Junior Guerra